Tag: foodborne

Preventing “Piercing of The Veil” – Practical Tips For Food Companies – Factors Courts Review for Veil Piercing (part II of III)

By guest blogger Jerry Chiang When courts decide whether to pierce the corporate veil, their analysis is typically a three-step process: (1) whether the defendant-owner exerts sufficient control over the business entity, (2) whether there has been an abuse of corporate form, and (3) whether there is an injury to a third party. There is … Continue Reading

2010 Food Safety Education Conference Announced

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service has announced the 2010 Food Safety Education Conference. The conference will be held in Atlanta from March 23 through 26, 2010. Although the agenda is still a work in progress, you can expect sessions on foodborne illnesses, outreach to the medical community, food safety education initiatives, social … Continue Reading

Future of Food Litigation and Obama’s Food Safety Working Group

President Obama’s Food Safety Working Group announced its Key Findings on July 7. Three groups of initiatives were announced: 1) Salmonella, 2) National Traceback and Response System, and 3) Improved Organization of Federal Food Safety Responsibilities. All of these represent major shifts in food policy. Coming changes will impact nearly every part of the nation’s food … Continue Reading

Why Are Food-borne Organisms Associated with Beef?

 USDA’s Be Food Safe Twitter Feed circulated its Fact Sheet titled “Beef . . . from Farm to Table.” First published a few years ago, this might be of interest to businesses involved in the sale, marketing, labeling, and/or packaging of beef. The article is a helpful primer on the history of beef, current industry practices, USDA’s … Continue Reading

Food-Borne Illness: Glass Half-Empty or Half-Full?

The Centers for Disease Control has issued a study of the incidence of food-borne illness in ten states.  The study, by the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network, known as "FoodNet", in general concludes that food-borne illness has not significantly either increased or decreased in the United States since 2004, after substantial gains in food safety … Continue Reading
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