ACI Food-Borne Illness Conference in Chicago October 27 - 28, 2010

American Conference Institute (“ACI”) will hold its 4th National Conference on Food-Borne Illness Claims in Chicago, October 27 to 28. Highlights of this year's conference will include:

• Appearances by a number of current and former high-level regulators such as Dr. Arthur Liang from CDC, Dr. David Goldman from USDA, Dr. David Acheson formerly of FDA, Dr. Bob Brackett formerly of CFSAN, Jack Guzewich from FDA, Dr. Bill Keene from Oregon Public Health Division and Benjamin Miller from Minnesota Department of Agriculture

• Mock witness examination of a testifying epidemiologist

• Insights from of the nation's top in-house and outside food-borne illness counsel

The complete conference brochure can be linked here.

Unfortunately, my schedule won't allow me to join the conference this year (I've spoken at the first three ACI national conferences on food-borne illness). But I can arrange for a conference discount. Just give me a call (206-386-7595) or send me an email.

Preserving the Brand and Avoiding Media Backlash During a Crisis

I'll be moderating and speaking on a panel at the upcoming ACI's Advanced Summit on Food Safety Regulatory Compliance in Chicago, June 28-29. Scott Rickman from Del Monte, public relations professionals and I will be presenting on  "Effectively Responding to Negative Media Coverage: How to Avoid the Backlash" (If you plan to attend, register soon and contact me for a conference discount).

In my practice, I abide by two principles when involved with a case that has potential for negative media coverage:

1. Preservation of the Brand May Trump the Litigation: Even the most serious food-borne illness or consumer fraud claims may not be as significant as preservation of the client's brand. And what may seem like a smart litigation strategy may not be in the best interest of the brand.

For example, ownership of a crisis may be the best way out for a company faced with a widespread food-borne illness outbreak. The 2008 Maple Leaf foods outbreak is a prime example. Maple Leaf foods is one of the largest food companies in Canada and was faced with a deadly nationwide listeria outbreak linked to deli meat processed at one of its plants. Its CEO, Michael McCain, famously took immediate ownership of the crisis, which lead to restoration of both the brand's name and its stock value. Mr. McCain was quoted post mortem as saying:

“Going through the crisis there are two advisors I’ve paid no attention to. The first are the lawyers, and the second are the accountants . . . . It’s not about money or legal liability, this is about being accountable for providing consumers with safe food.”

In other cases, a strategy that "sacrifices" a single product line or a single restaurant for the good of the chain or other product lines may be the right strategy.

Though right for the client, either strategy might be uncomfortable for the litigation team as it constitutes something close to an admission of liability. As one communications expert has said:

“[L]awyers need to understand that legal liability isn’t the only factor to consider in a crisis. But that’s not an easy pill for many lawyers to swallow. They believe future litigation is prejudiced if a CEO makes an apology . . . .”

Which leads me to my second principle:

2. Call the Communications/Public Relations Experts: Lawyers are multi-talented. However, lawyers are not experts in public relations. As illustrated above, the right strategy for a branded food business may prioritize a public relations strategy. The only way to formulate the best strategy for the client is to involve and listen to the entire crisis response team, including the communications/public relations experts.

Take-Aways from November 17 Webinar: Sustainable Foods Increase Litigation Risks: Developing Strategies to Minimize Exposure

On November 17, we held our final webinar in a three-part series on bringing sustainable food products to market. Take-aways from the third webinar include:

• Be aware that "natural" is a hot button when advertising and labeling sustainable food products.

• "Sustainable" is not addressed in FTC Green Guides so it is imperative to be specific with your claim and/or use third-party certification.

• Truitt Brothers packaging/labels depict the source of their ingredients.

• Food-borne illness issues affect all food producers. Large producers have made significant investments in prevention in recent years; small producers of sustainable products without capital to improve farming or manufacturing practices are at a competitive disadvantage and possibly more susceptible to legal exposure from food borne illness claims.

• Food sellers should identify a crisis management team, review supplier agreements and understand insurance coverage to mitigate risk.

• Food sellers should understand that product recall coverage is excluded on most Commercial General Liability coverage forms.

Thanks again to our presenters and attendees. The recorded webcast was archived and is accessible here. Click here to access a PDF copy of the presentation slides.

Stay tuned for a possible new webinar series on food traceability. We're tracking the latest regulatory and legislative developments.

Take-Aways from November 3 Webinar: Making Good Marketing Claims: Product Labeling Pitfalls, Third-Party Certification and "Green Washing"

Tuesday, November 3, we held our second webinar in a three-part series on bringing sustainable food products to market. Thanks again to our presenters and attendees. The recorded webcast was archived and is accessible at this link. Click here to access a PDF copy of the presentation slides.

Take-aways from the second webinar include:

• With the exception of the FDA’s policy on “natural” claims, it has been silent on “green claims.”

• “Natural” could be hottest claim on the market but is becoming controversial. Food companies should continually monitor the marketplace to see which claims are drawing challenges.

• Food companies should pay attention to consumers union findings regarding eco-label credibility.

• While third-party certification may not help every food business, certification is a tool that supports your brand and your marketing/sales strategy.

• Retail leaders in sustainability, such as Burgerville, aspire for continuity of sustainability in each link in its supply chain.

• To understand the FTC green guidelines companies need to appreciate three key points: substantiation, specificity and qualification.

• To avoid “green washing” issues, food companies need to understand the complex matrix of federal, state, local and foreign statutes, regulations and guidelines governing “green” advertising.

I hope you can join me, Steve Marinkovich from Propel Insurance, my colleague at Stoel Rives, Anne Glazer, and Peter Truitt from Truitt Bros., Inc. on November 17, at 9 am PST, noon EST, (live Twitter feed at #sustainlaw) for the last webinar in the series as we discuss the following:

• Preventing and Dealing with Consumer Fraud, Unfair Trade and False Advertising Claims from Consumers and Competitors

• Real-Life Businesses Approaches to Sustainability, Product Labeling and Marketing

• Coping with Increased Risks of Food-Borne Illness from Local or Small Farm Products

• Insurance Coverage You Need, Think You May Have but Don’t Have or Think You May Want but Shouldn’t Get

Some Take-Aways from ACI's 3rd National Forum on Food-Borne Illness Litigation

American Conference Institute (ACI) recently held its latest conference on food-borne illness litigation. The conference has been a fairly intimate gathering of the nation’s lawyers, insurers and experts involved with food-borne illness litigation.

This year, I had the privilege of moderating an in-house counsel “think tank.” The panel was composed of lawyers from a nice cross-section of food businesses: Yum Brands, Hormel, Fresh Express and SUPERVALU (though for each, food-borne illness litigation is a rare event)  A slide-deck from the panel can be found here.

Also among the presenters at this year’s conference were Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) Dr. Arthur Liang and USDA/FSIS representative Dr. Dan Engeljohn. Both presentations provided fascinating insight into changes afoot in food safety enforcement and policy at the federal level. Here are some of the take-aways:

“Outbreaks Waiting to Be Discovered” – Dr. Liang opined that, based on surveilled illnesses, most food-borne illness outbreaks are not presently discovered. He believes that recent data shows that there are perhaps 2-3 times more outbreaks nationally than what’s been uncovered over the last few years.

• Food Safety Progress Being Undone by Retail Deli Operations – FSIS says there has been a “steady increase in risky behavior at the retail level.” According to Dr. Engeljohn, budget authority is being sought to intervene with retailers, particularly smaller supermarket deli operations.

Negative Tested Product Can Be Considered Adulterated - FSIS will be issuing a policy soon that for the first time will consider a “negative tested product to be determined adulterated” under circumstances where an associated product tested positive for pathogens.

Non-0157 STECs - FSIS will be finalizing methodology to detect non-0157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC).

Comment On Recent New York Times E. Coli and Beef Article: How Retailers Can Protect Themselves

Co-Authored By Guest Blogger Scott Hansen

According to its website, last Sunday’s New York Times article on E. coli and beef is among the most widely read pieces published by the newspaper this week. The article tells the story of a 22-year-old Minnesota dance instructor who was left paralyzed after being infected with a strain of E. coli in an “Angus Beef Pattie” she ate in fall of 2007. The article traces the story of her burger, points out the many limitations in the current system, and calls eating beef a “gamble.”

While the article is clearly targeted at meat producers and processors, food retailers selling beef products, such as grocery stores and restaurants, are also at risk. This piece is a reminder of the need for retailers to take steps to ensure proper systems and procedures for tracing food to its source (according to yesterday's statement by Secretary Vilsack, retail traceability of ground beef is soon to be a USDA requirement). The Times lauds Costco, which it says is one of the few big producers that tests trimmings for E. coli before grinding.

Retailers should also be mindful of the utility of supplier agreements sufficiently tailored to limit liability or to procure insurance coverage. The greater protections afforded by well-drafted supplier agreements and carefully placed insurance are the best way to mitigate exposure.

Some may choose strong indemnification provisions and additional insured provisions. Another route, not yet the prevailing trend in the industry but perhaps in the near future, involves wrap-up insurance covering the entire supply chain, accompanied by covenants of cooperation between members of the supply chain.

Wrap-up insurance/covenants of cooperation approach has the advantage of potentially avoiding expensive and reputation-damaging litigation between members of the supply chain. Wrap-up insurance is also more likely to result in sufficient coverage to protect the retailer or restaurant chain.

No matter the path chosen, thoughtful placement of insurance coverage and confidence in supply chain contracts can help a food company weather the storm of a food-borne illness outbreak.

Before the Outbreak, Preapprove Defense Counsel with Insurer

When a food-borne illness outbreak happens, few food companies (especially those whose brand is at stake) want an unfamiliar defense lawyer who has little knowledge about food-borne illness responding to claims asserted against them. Unless a food company maintains a high, self-insured retention or has the lawyer of its choosing preselected, its insurer might appoint on the food company’s behalf low-cost defense counsel ill-equipped to respond to the claims and protect the brand.

Commercial General Liability insurance and Products liability insurance commonly maintained by food companies to protect them from the risks of food-borne illness outbreak usually will not cover the damage an outbreak can have on a company’s brand, stock value or sales. Lawyers appointed by insurers may have little understanding of the insured’s business or the impact the outbreak can have on its brand. Unlike in other areas, such as securities litigation, insurers are not as likely to have a panel or preapproved list of experienced food liability lawyers ready to deploy.

What a food company should consider before a food-borne illness outbreak happens:

1. Identify lawyers who are:

A. Familiar with (or will pledge on their dime to learn) the food company's business and brands;

B. Experienced in responding to consumer claims and food-borne illness; and

C. Knowledgeable about potential expert witnesses (about both those that the company will hire and those that plaintiffs will hire).

For companies with active crisis management plans , these lawyers likely have already been identified and included on the crisis management team.

2. Work with your broker, insurance coverage lawyer and preselected defense lawyer(s) to get preapproval of your chosen lawyers and agreement on their fees

For the sake of the business relationship (and self-interest), many insurers may agree to preapproval. Consider seeking preapproval at the time of renewal when a commercial insured may have the most leverage with an insurer.

For those with preapproved defense counsel, please consider sharing your experiences and insights. Comment or email.

Tool For Food Companies and Litigators - New Guidelines for Foodborne Disease Outbreak Response

Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response (“CIFOR”) has published new guidelines designed to help local, state and federal agencies to improve their response to outbreaks. I became aware of this (again) through Ricardo Carvajal, who was a reviewer for the guidelines, and his firm’s FDA Law Blog. I agree with Ricardo that while the guidelines are designed for public agencies they have value for food businesses.

According to CIFOR, “[t]he guidelines are intended to give all agencies a common foundation from which to work and to provide examples of the key activities that should occur during the response to outbreaks of foodborne disease.”

Anticipating how the public health agency will behave will not only assist in crisis management, but it may also prevent the crisis. As discussed previously in this blog, one of the benefits of good crisis management is the ability to reach out and offer assistance to the investigating public health agencies. Keeping current on protocols that we can expect agencies to follow is a good practice.

The guidelines are also of some value to litigators. In the face of an outbreak investigation, they provide tools to assess the merits of the agency investigation. While it is always difficult to challenge a public health agency’s findings (no matter how flawed), the guidelines may help.

Tort Damages Not the Only Exposure from Food-Borne Illness Outbreaks

For lawyers and insurance adjustors, compartmentalizing food-borne illness claims is easy. They often see their jobs solely as minimizing the tort liability and legal fees. In my experience, attorneys and adjustors often fail to appreciate how outbreaks can affect a client’s (or even a whole industry’s) business going forward. Often, the long-term business losses of a food-borne illness outbreak, recall, or government alert are not insured.

There is no better example of how a nationally reported food-borne illness outbreak can affect an entire industry (or even an entire category of food products) than the 2006 E. coli spinach outbreak. Two new studies published by the Agriculture & Applied Economics Association (AAEA) in its Choices magazine analyze consumer information and studies in the wake of the spinach outbreak. 

Among the highlights from the first study, “Public Response to Large-Scale Produce Contamination” by Carra Cuite and William K. Hallman, were findings that Americans were more aware of advisories beginning than ending. For example, 87% of spinach consumers knew about the outbreak, but more than six weeks after the FDA had lifted its spinach warnings “almost half (45%) of people who were aware of the spinach recall were not confident that the recall had ended.”

A second study entitled “E. coli Outbreaks Affect Demand for Salad Vegetables” was authored by Faysal Fahs, Ron C. Mittelhammer, and Jill J. McCluskey. It examines the cumulative effects that sequential outbreaks can have on consumer demand and concludes that “the empirical results suggest that the subsequent outbreaks had a greater impact on the consumption of salad vegetables than the first.”

For food companies the lesson is this:

A lawyer’s role in responding to a food product crisis is important. But the roles of others, such as public relations experts, may be as important or more important in preserving the business. Make sure your lawyer (and your insurer) understands that the world may not revolve around simply resolving the tort claims as economically as possible.

ACI Announces 3rd National Forum on Food-Borne Illness Litigation

The American Conference Institute announced this week its latest food litigation conference. Here’s the conference brochure. The conference will take place in Chicago on October 26-27 at the Sutton Place Hotel.

Plaintiffs’ lawyer Bill Marler and defense lawyer Al Maxwell are co-chairing the conference. This year promises a greater variety of presentations by in-house food personnel, government regulators, and others. As in past years, I expect a stimulating exchange of information and vigorous debate about competing views of food liability issues. Feel free to email me or comment if you are attending or want more information.

Avoid Unnecessary Labeling Claims - Ensure That Cooking Instructions Are Adequate

Bill Marler funded independent research at the University of Idaho to study the adequacy of cooking instructions found on the packaging on various retail brands of frozen ground beef patties. The research was published this month in Food Protection Trends.

The study found that three of the packages included cooking instructions that “would be inadequate to produce a safely cooked patty.” Most of the issues raised in the article center on the variability in cooking techniques, e.g., pan frying, using a propane grill, or preheating, and variability in cooking temperatures. Suggested solutions for improved cooking instructions are included in the study.

For food sellers trying to minimize or avoid claims, adequate cooking instructions are a good thing. Even if food-borne illness claims cannot be avoided, the scope of the claims and damages can be limited by providing adequate, "bullet-proof", cooking instructions.

Kudos to Bill Marler for “putting skin in the game” and funding this study.

Liability Limits: How Much Should Your Food Company Maintain?

Food business clients frequently want to ensure that they have sufficient liability limits in the event of an outbreak (they also want to make sure they have adequate coverage, but this is a separate discussion). Determining the amount of a business’s limits depends on the business’s possible exposures. No one-size-fits-all formula is available. Every business should have a yearly conversation with its counsel and broker to determine what makes sense.

Disclaimers aside, a few pieces of recent news should help inform the discussion of liability limits:

First, we've learned more about the food-borne illness claims filed in the peanut outbreak earlier this year. Here’s a complete list of the claims (personal injury, commercial, etc.) asserted in the PCA bankruptcy and a newspaper article about them. Most of the claims appear to be filed by Marler Clark, though other food-borne illness claims also appear. So far, I count about 100 claims filed in the PCA bankruptcy (out of a CDC-reported 714 illnesses). Of those claims, at least eight resulted in deaths. The death claims are valued by the plaintiffs'  at $10 million each. The nondeath claims are valued at up to $1 million each. Total personal injury claims are approximately $150 million. Plaintiffs have probably overstated their claims, but given the national outrage against PCA, a jury might lend credibility to the bloated values and award larger sums.

The other recent news is that CDC has released some interesting statistics about food-borne illnesses. For 2006, leafy vegetables and fruits/nuts accounted for the largest number of reported cases of food-borne illness (33%). Produce and nut products that might not have been associated in the past with food-borne illness (and, therefore, liability exposure) are now frequently associated with outbreaks. As exemplified by the PCA situation, claims from a national or even a regional outbreak from produce or nuts can easily exceed $100 million.

Improved Surveillance Will Lead to More Food-Borne Illness Claims

We’ve explained previously in this blog why increased surveillance by state and federal agencies will lead to detection of more outbreaks (and, therefore, more legal exposure). Others seem to agree.

Law360 published a nice interview with Jim Neale at McGuire Woods, another lawyer experienced in the food liability arena ( a Law360 subscription is needed to access the full article). Jim is quoted in the article as saying, “when, despite the best efforts of all concerned, outbreaks do occur, improved surveillance allows them to be caught and, most often, quickly tracked to the source.” And, as federal money increases to the state health departments (the front line in detecting most of the nation’s outbreaks), rates of detection will accelerate.

Tracking the Food Safety Working Group - More or Less Legal Exposure For Food Sellers?

This week the Obama administration announced the launch of a new website for the recently formed food safety working group. Obama announced the formation of this group in March in the wake of the high-profile food safety issues surrounding PCA peanut products

This website will assist in tracking the efforts of the working group. As discussed previously on this blog, this group is expected to make recommendations aimed at detection, awareness and government reorganization. Possible examples include increasing funding to states to monitor food-borne illness, combining FDA and USDA food safety efforts, reexamining mandatory recall authority, increasing retail enforcement and implementing more aggressive consumer warnings.

What is not clear is whether the working group will look beyond just detection, awareness and reorganization to bolder initiatives that may result in less consumer illness and less legal exposure for food sellers. Bolder initiatives could include funding for irradiation, consumer food safety education, and fast-track development and implementation of technology that can sample food products for whole colonies of microorganisms

 

Defending Liability in Foodborne Illness Outbreaks

I’m asked frequently about the “anatomy of litigation.” I plan to write more in this space on the topic. For now, some may find useful the slides from a presentation I gave recently on “Defending Liability in Foodborne Illness Outbreaks.” I discussed what I see as three prototypes of consumer claims and possible strategies to respond to each.

Next Generation Sequencing for the Food Industry

More and more, it is becoming true that nothing drives detection and prevention of food-borne illness than technology (and, of course, with advancements in detection come potential increases in exposure to legal liability). No technological advancement may be more significant than Next Generation Sequencing ("Next Gen Sequencing").  

I've recently had the opportunity to spend time learning about Next Gen Sequencing with Dr. Andrew Benson, a genetic microbiologist at the University of Nebraska’s Department of Food Science and Technology. Dr. Benson has received large research grants to harness the power of Next Gen sequencing. If you’re interested in the field, take a look at this short video, where Dr. Benson explains the technology, and check out the information on the CAGE (Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology) website.

As described on the CAGE website, this Next Gen technology “allows a single machine to accomplish in 48 hours what used to take an entire room full of machines and an army of
staff a month to achieve.”

Dr. Benson and others at CAGE explain further that:

Having such a powerful diagnostic technique now challenges us to rethink completely how we might go about risk assessment. Instead of looking for a single “indicator organism” in a food sample, we can now look at the entire population of microorganisms in a food sample and ask if the community of organisms present is the expected species that normally occupy that food or if the sample contains numbers of unexpected species, and in particular those species that are unique to fecal or soil environments. Thus, our assessment of “risk” is now based on the entire population, including the most abundant species of fecal and soil communities. Because our assessment is based on the entire composition, multiple species that are unique to feces or soil can be used in the determination, making the assessment much more accurate and robust. Moreover, the assessment is not limited to “risk” as we can also determine if the microbial community in a food sample has shifted toward spoilage (which gives us shelf-life predictions) or is consistent with “good” organoleptic properties of the food. The list of applications goes on and on.

Discoveries using this technology are happening at astonishing speed. PFGE testing, now considered the "gold standard" and generic E.coli testing may soon seem old fashioned and crude.  

Five New Year's Resolutions

Unfortunately, 2009 does not promise to be any easier than 2008 in protecting your business against food liability claims. Many argue that threats will only increase in the new year. Here are five things you can do to reduce exposure in the coming year:

1. Review Insurance Coverage and Limits Carefully – Both the variety and size of claims are escalating fast. For example, just a couple of years ago consumer claims from non-O157 E. coli, melamine, diacetyl or organic labeling seemed far-fetched, but all are now a grave reality. Federal, state and local governments will continue improving detection techniques since the rash of large, national food-borne illness outbreaks in 2006-08. The Obama administration will likely make increased funding in this area a priority. The odds that your company will be targeted in a nationwide outbreak resulting in claims in the hundreds of millions of dollars are increasing. Because of the exposure, insurance companies now more than ever will be looking for ways to reduce their coverage.

2. Review and Revise Supply Chain Agreements – Aside from insurance, one of the most effective ways to reduce, spread and mitigate risk is to ensure that those in your supply chain provide adequate insurance and indemnity for problems related to their products. But just because your supply agreement happens to mention insurance and indemnity does not necessarily mean those clauses will help when you need them. The only way to ensure that they will be honored and enforced is to ensure that your legal team (experienced in litigating these clauses) drafts these carefully.

3. Reassess Suppliers – Your choice of suppliers may be key to avoiding or reducing risk. Even if you demand sufficient insurance and indemnity from a supplier, a supplier of sufficient size may not be able to access insurance or have assets available to satisfy indemnity obligations. As important as your food safety, HAACP and other programs may be, they are really only as strong as your suppliers’ programs. Careful audit and assessment of your suppliers’ food safety programs is important.

4. Increase Scrutiny Against Fraudulent Imports – Melamine, tainted rice and now “laundered honey” are all good examples of how fraud in the global food chain can dramatically affect unsuspecting U.S. food sellers. [add more advice here?]

5. Review, Update and Rehearse Crisis Management Plans – How your company is prepared to respond to a crisis is a good predictor of how your company will weather the crisis. With the stakes increasing, you need to be prepared to face the worst. Continual review, updating and rehearsal of your crisis management plan is key. Everybody on the crisis management team needs to understand his or her role and be ready for different scenarios.
 

Practical Advice for Litigating the Food Case

Click here for the slides from a presentation I gave recently with Shawn Stevens entitled "Practical Advice for Litigating the Case: Retaining Experts, Assessing Damages and Planing Trial Strategy." Two threads of my part of the presentation were organization and relationships (I believe that these were also central to Obama's campaign hence the campaign log).

In the coming months, I intend to use this blog to continue my series on the anatomy of complex, multi-party consumer based claims. Building organization and relationships will be discussed heavily as central to positioning a case succussfully for trial (and settlement).

Is It Really A Food-Borne Illness?

At a recent presentation, Dr. Alan Melnick, a public health officer in both Oregon and Washington, provided a useful list of alternative causes of symptoms to consider when someone claims a food-borne illness. Other causes of symptoms that might be confused for food-borne illness include (but may not be limited to):

Another practical piece of advice offered by Dr. Melnick: When assessing a food-borne illness claim, determine whether the incubation period is compatible with the illness. Incubation periods (along with other useful information) were provided by Dr. Melnick (relying upon the CDC) as follows:

Pathogen

Incubation

Symptoms

Duration

Source

Bacillus cereus

1-6 hours (vomiting); 6-24 hours (diarrhea)

Nausea and vomiting or colic and diarrhea 24 hours (short form); 24-48 hours (long form) Soil organism found in raw, dry and processed foods, e.d. rice
Campylobacter 2-10 days; usually 2-5 days Diarrhea, cramps, fever and vomiting; diarrhea may be bloody 2-10 days Raw and undercooked poultry, unpasteurized milk, water
Clostridium botulinum (botulism) 2 hours to 8 days; usually 12-48 hours Vomiting, diarrhea, blurred vision, double vision, difficulty swallowing, descending muscle weakness Variable (days to months) Home-canned food, improperly canned commercial foods
Clostridium perfringens 6-24 hours Cramps, diarrhea 24-48 hours Meats, poultry, gravy; foods kept warm
Enterro-hemorrhagic E. coli, including E. coli O157:H7 and other Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) 1-10 days; usually 3-4 days Diarrhea, frequently bloody; abdominal cramps (often severe); little or no fever; 5-10% develop Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) and average of 7 days after onset, when diarrhea is improving (more common in children, elderly and immune-compromised) 5-10 days Ground beef, unpasteurized milk and juice, raw fruits and vegetables, contaminated water, sprouts, person to person
Listeria 9-48 hours for GI symptoms; 2-6 weeks for invasive disease Fever, muscle aches and nausea or diarrhea; pregnant women may have flu-like illness and stillbirth; elderly, immune-compromised and infants infected from mother can get sepsis and meningitis Variable Fresh soft cheeses, unpasteurized or inadequately pasteurized milk, ready-to eat deli meats and hot dogs
Salmonella 6 hours to 10 days; usually 5-48 hours Nausea, diarrhea, cramps, fever 4-7 days Poultry, eggs, meat, unpasteurized milk or juice, raw fruits and vegetables (e.g., sprouts), person to person
Shigella 12 hours to 6 days; usually 2-4 days Abdominal cramps, fever and diarrhea; stool may contain blood and mucus 4-7 days Contaminated food or water, raw foods touched by food workers, raw vegetables, egg salads, person to person
Staph (toxin) 30 minutes to 8 hours; usually 2-4 hours Nausea, cramps, vomiting, diarrhea  24-48 hours Custards, cream fillings, potato or egg salad, sliced meats
Vibrio cholerae 1-5 days Profuse watery diarrhea and vomiting, severe dehydration 3-7 days Contaminated water and shellfish, street vended food 
Vibrio parahaemolyticus 4-30 hours Watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting  2-5 days Undercooked or raw seafood (fish and shellfish) 
Vibrio vulnificus 1-7 days Vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain; more severe in patients with liver disease or who are immune-compromised; can cause invasive infection (sepsis) 2-8 days Raw seafood, particularly oysters, harvested from warm coastal waters 
Yersinia 1-10 days; usually 4-6 days Appendicitis-like symptoms (diarrhea and vomiting, abdominal pain)  1-3 weeks  Undercooked pork, unpasteurized milk, contaminated water

 

Dramatic Shift in Plaintiffs' Burden of Proof for Food-Borne Illness Claims?

A California Court of Appeal panel recently issued a lengthy decision in Sarti v. Salt Creek Ltd. (2008 WL 5006537)  reversing a trial court’s grant of judgment notwithstanding the verdict  (JNOV) in a food-borne illness case involving campylobacter. Sarti is alarming. The California court substantially lightened the plaintiff’s burden of proof by requiring her to come forth with only enough evidence to “infer” a causational nexus between her illness and the defendant’s food. Close examination of the facts in Sarti reveals that the plaintiff in that case may not have proven anything to establish a causational nexus.


Sarti involves a woman who allegedly became ill with campylobacter the morning after she consumed a raw ahi tuna appetizer at the defendant’s restaurant. According to the Cleveland Clinic, campylobacter has a two- to five-day incubation period. The court does not explain in its decision what, if any, expert testimony was introduced to explain how the incubation period was compatible with the plaintiff’s allegations. Without expert testimony explaining away the apparent insurmountable problem of the incubation period, plaintiff's case should fail as a matter of law. In other words, the plaintiff’s case should never have survived summary judgment.


Not only does the incubation period make the plaintiff’s claim problematic, but other sources of contamination were identified. For example, the court explained that “Sarti herself worked as a supermarket checker the day she became ill, and could, at least in theory, have picked up campylobacter from a leaking bag of raw chicken she might have scanned.”

The plaintiff’s expert offered some theories about how the tuna dish could have become cross-contaminated. According to the health department, “Wipe down rags were not being sanitized between in wiping down surfaces. There was also an insufficient amount of sanitizer in the dishwasher. Chicken tongs were sometimes uses for other food. Raw vegetables were stored under ‘raw meat.’”

The Sarti decision does not indicate whether the plaintiff’s expert could identify any of these theories as more or less likely than sources having nothing to do with the defendant’s restaurant (and, in fact, given the incompatibility of the incubation period, one would think that the defendant’s restaurant should be discounted as the cause). The court does not explain how a reasonable jury could conclude that the plaintiff’s cross-contamination theories were any more likely than the alternative theories for the plaintiff’s illness.

Instead of citing evidence or expert testimony, the Sarti court relies upon a series of food-borne illness cases in California going back nearly a century that address issues of causation. All of the cases relied upon predate DNA serotyping of bacteria, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, modern techniques of epidemiology, microbiology and medicine. Sarti is seemingly a reversion to the dark ages of food science when it was reasonable to believe that the last thing a person ate is what made the person sick. The Sarti court ignores the science and believes that a jury should be able to do the same.

Registration Still Open For The ACI Food-Borne Illness Litigation Conference in Scottsdale

December 4-5 is the American Conference Institute’s 2nd National Forum on Food-Borne Illness Litigation. The first forum turned out to be a very engaging and diverse forum (e.g. plaintiffs lawyers, industry lawyers, top state and federal officials) on emerging issues in food-borne illness. I will be one of the many speakers. Ralph Weber, an accomplished trial lawyer from Wisconsin, and I will be offering "practical advice for litigating the case, retaining experts, assessing damages and planning a trial strategy." The focus of my presentation will be a discussion of how to develop trial strategy and themes at the earliest possible point, selection of experts and assessment of damages.

I’d urge anybody involved in dealing with risks from food-borne illness think about attending. If you register, mention the promotion code 724L09.S and you’ll get $200 off the conference price. Hope to see you there.

Breakthrough in Detection of BSE (a.k.a. "Mad Cow Disease")

No food-borne illness induces consumer fear like Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE a.k.a. "Mad Cow Disease"). The beef industry in particular has gone to great lengths to take preventative steps against the introduction of BSE into U.S. herds. A big problem in controlling BSE is that it’s difficult to detect. The only detection method currently available involves the slaughter of a suspect animal and a series of not very reliable tests.

Now comes word that researchers at Cornell University have devised a “tuning fork” method that may detect BSE at the prion level:

Harold Craighead and colleagues at Cornell University have developed nanoscale resonators, which are tiny devices that function like tuning forks by changing pitch with increased mass. When prions bind to the resonator’s silicon sensor, it changes the vibrational resonant frequency of the device. In experimental trials, the sensor detected prions at concentrations as low as two nanograms per milliliter, the smallest levels measured to date.

Though still a while away from practical application, the technology may have dramatic effects on the ability to ensure the safety of the nation’s beef supply. The BSE “tuning fork” is a good example of yet another new technology industry that the government can use to ensure food safety and consumer confidence.

Farming and safe handling practices alone cannot provide the level of assurance that consumers demand in their food supply. Tuning fork, irradiation, and better bacteria detection are all vital tools that industry, government, and consumers need to embrace.

Change You Can Expect: What President Obama May Do About Food-Borne Illness Surveillance

The Obama administration has promised sweeping changes in all corners of the federal government. We can expect the new President to push an ambitious legislative and administrative law agenda in 2009. What does this mean for food regulation? A partial answer may be gleaned by looking at the Improving Food-borne Illness Surveillance and Response Act of 2008, a bill Obama introduced last summer after he become the presumptive Democratic nominee.

Some things of note:

1. The bill appears targeted in large part on increasing the government’s “capacity” for detection of food-borne illness—both by increasing cooperation between local, state and federal agencies and by enhancing detection capability through proliferation of cutting-edge technology. The bill proposes $25 million in block grants to state and local agencies. As we've said before in this space, better detection capacity correlates to more detected outbreaks. More detected outbreaks translates to more food-borne illness claims and affects everyone in the food industry (especially restaurants and those selling fresh produce).

2. One of the five goals of the bill is to “Strengthen oversight of food safety at the retail level.” I’m unclear on exactly what is meant by this goal. Does this mean, for example, that Obama might be interested in granting FSIS the jurisdiction to inspect supermarket delis or butchers?

3. Also of interest is what does not seem to be included in the bill. Specifically, the two most talked about (and controversial) federal food safety reform ideas: (1) mandatory recall authority and (2) merger of FSIS and FDA food safety programs. Should we read into the bill that President-Elect Obama does not support these reforms? Time will tell. All that is certain is that change is coming . . .

"Organic Pathogens Exclusion"

Insurers are making efforts to exclude food-borne illness claims from coverage under comprehensive general liability (“CGL”) policies. The "Organic Pathogens Exclusion" is a good example.

While a claim for food-borne illness may normally be covered by a CGL policy, if you have an organic pathogens exclusion, your insurer will not provide a defense and will not cover your losses if your business is sued as a result of a food-borne illness.

Organic pathogens exclusions can take multiple forms. Some policies include an endorsement that excludes any “loss” for “any actual, alleged or threatened exposure to, existence of, presence of, ingestion of, inhalation of or contact with any biological agents.” “Biological agents” are usually defined to include things like bacteria, viruses or other pathogens (whether or not a microorganism).

Other policies simply include an endorsement providing that “this policy does not insure any loss, damage, claim, cost, expense, fine, penalty or other sum either directly or indirectly arising out of, relating to or caused by an “organic pathogen.” These policies generally define “organic pathogen” to mean “any organic irritant or contaminant, including but not limited to fungus, bacteria, virus, or other microorganism of any type, including but not limited to their byproducts such as spores or mycotoxin, or any hazardous substance as classified by the EPA.”

Any business involved in food production should take notice. Insurers are actively marketing policies with organic pathogen exclusions to food businesses whose greatest liability exposure may be food-borne illness. Careful and regular review of insurance policies and coverages is essential. 
 

Dos and Don'ts for Executives Managing a Crisis

As discussed frequently in this blog, management of an outbreak at its inception determines the course of the crisis (and, in some cases, the fate of the company).

The Globe and Mail, in its ongoing coverage of the Maple Leaf Foods Listeria outbreak, today published a helpful punch list of 15 dos and don’ts for corporate executives managing a food-borne outbreak.

The last two items on the list may be the least obvious but are among the most important:

“14. Do make a list of the five questions you would least like to be asked and be prepared to answer them, since somebody will undoubtedly ask them.
“15. Do set up a rumour control hotline or website if rampant speculation could fuel the crisis.”

A hotline for collecting consumer information and complaints can be valuable. It allows the company not only to get control over and manage misinformation (the point being made in the Globe and Mail), but also to gather information about how many people the outbreak affects and who has fallen ill. Even more important, a hotline may enable the company to direct ill people to appropriate medical treatment, minimizing or even eliminating litigation.