FSIS Tells Ground Poultry Producers to Reassess Their Food Safety Plans

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued a press release on Wednesday, December 5, 2012, announcing that companies producing raw ground chicken and turkey and similar products will be required to reassess their sanitation procedures and pathogen control plans over the next few months. Specifically, over the next 90 days, producers of raw ground chicken and turkey must conduct a thorough examination of its current Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) to confirm its ability to identify hazards and better prevent foodborne illness. After the 90 day period, FSIS inspection program personnel will begin verifying that establishments that manufacture raw ground turkey or chicken products have indeed reassessed their HACCP plans.

FSIS will be documenting whether establishments made any changes to their HACCP plans in response to the required reassessment and will later evaluate those changes. Later, the agency intends to publish guidance materials for the industry on best practices to reduce Salmonella in ground and comminuted (further processed by mechanical separation or deboning and chopped, flaked, minced or broken down) poultry.

In making this announcement, officials at FSIS are hoping to lower the prevalence of Salmonella contamination within these types of products. This attention to the ground poultry product industry with a focus on Salmonella comes as a response to recent outbreaks that have sickened hundreds across the country in the past few years. Just in the last two years there have been two major Salmonella outbreaks associated with ground poultry products that affected consumers nationwide.

In conducting these reassessments, FSIS is advising companies to look at, among other things, the following:

[E]stablishments should evaluate the adequacy of their sanitation procedures for processing equipment, including grinders, blenders, pipes, and other components and surfaces in contact with the product. Thus, Sanitation SOPs, other prerequisite programs, or HACCP plans should address procedures that ensure that all slaughter and further processing equipment, employee hands, tools, and clothing, and food contact surfaces are maintained in a sanitary manner to minimize the potential for cross contamination within and among lots of production. In addition, FSIS expects establishments to ensure that slaughter and dressing procedures are designed to prevent contamination to the maximum extent possible. Such procedures should, at a minimum, be designed to limit the exterior contamination of birds before exsanguination, as well as minimize digestive tract content spillage during dressing process.

Other FSIS recommendations include validating cooking instructions, examining lotting practices that minimize contact between lots, and requiring suppliers to show that they have used a Salmonella intervention step.

In FSIS’s notice, the agency also announced that it will be expanding the Salmonella verification sampling program to include other raw comminuted poultry products, in addition to ground product; it will be increasing the sample size for laboratory analysis from 25 grams to 325 grams to provide consistency as the Agency moves toward analyzing samples for Salmonella and Campylobacter; and it will be conducting sampling to determine the prevalence of Salmonella in raw comminuted poultry products.

Although these new procedures are intended for producers of ground or comminuted chicken and turkey products, FSIS is recommending that manufacturers of comminuted products derived from cattle, hogs, and sheep or comminuted poultry products derived from poultry other than chicken or turkeys also consider assessing whether their food safety systems present food safety vulnerabilities.

Litigation and Insurance Coverage Risks from Swine Flu (H1N1)

For food companies (and other businesses), a dangerous and deadly flu pandemic (e.g., H1N1) can be a business disaster. Adding insult to injury is personal injury litigation and the accompanying insurance coverage nightmares that follow.

What Are the Personal Injury Litigation Risks?

For restaurants, airlines, cruiselines, supermarkets, hospitals, schools, and other institutions, risk comes from exposure if customers can link their illness with employee or staff illnesses. While proof of causation will be a hurdle for these plaintiffs, employers without clear and enforced pandemic policies (e.g., policies aimed at limited transmission and keeping sick workers home) are at risk. Large-scale deaths of healthy children and adults will raise the stakes enough to garner attention from plaintiffs’ lawyers and motivate lawsuits (whether merited or not).

While workers’ compensation statutes generally shield employers from suits by their employees (both alive and deceased), the same bar may not apply to contract employees or customers. Both may have the right to sue if they can link exposure to illness.

Will Personal Injury Claims Be Covered by CGL Coverage?

Generally, third-party claims for bodily injury against a company should be covered by Commercial General Liability (CGL) coverage. Yet coverages, exclusions, and endorsements should be read carefully. With greater frequency, insurers are including relevant (and harsh) language excluding claims related to infectious disease. For example, many policies, especially those issued to food companies, include exclusions for “organic pathogens,” which could be construed by insurers to include flu viruses.

Insureds should also evaluate whether limits and excess coverages are sufficient. Increasing limits of liability are relatively inexpensive and should be considered. It’s not difficult to imagine claims exceeding $100 million if multiple deaths of healthy individuals are involved.

Will Lost Business and/or Lost Profits Be Covered by Business Interruption Coverage?

Possibly. The lawyers at Anderson, Kill and Olick have written a nice piece on this and other swine flu coverage issues. Here’s their summary of business interruption coverage for swine flu:

Depending on the facts, it may be possible for a swine flu pandemic to give rise to business interruption coverage. Such coverage typically is purchased by businesses as part of their property insurance policies, in the form of a rider or endorsement or an optional additional coverage. Business interruption coverage is designed to protect businesses from losses that they may suffer unexpectedly due to unavoidable interruptions in their daily operations.

Business interruption coverage may apply in a variety of circumstances, such as a forced shut-down, or a substantial impairment in access to, a business’ physical plant or warehouses. Recent, infamous examples of events giving rise to such business interruptions are the events of September 11, 2001, and Hurricane Katrina in Florida.

In most property policies, business interruption coverage is only triggered when the site suffers property damage. Physical damage, however, can include contamination of equipment. Moreover, some policies, particularly those written for policyholders in the hospitality industry, do provide coverage for losses stemming from infectious disease without requiring physical damage to premises. Further, civil authority coverage, which is triggered when authorities shut off access to an area in which a business is located, can be triggered without physical damage to the policyholder’s premises.

On the brink of a season during which some predict a possible dangerous pandemic, now is an opportune time for any company to gather its insurance coverage team (lawyers, risk managers, and brokers) to review and mitigate exposures.

Are Organic Foods Safer? Will Consumers Continue to Favor Organics?

Nobody disputes that consumers have a favorable view of organic certification in foods. Consumers generally believe that organic foods are healthier, and many believe they taste better. Yet, among food scientists, uncertainty prevails as to whether organics are safer, especially raw fruits and vegetables.

Absence of synthetic fertilizers is a primary distinction between organic and non-organic foods. And, from a safety standpoint, the absence of pesticides is the only provable claim that organic foods are healthier. But does the absence of one hazard imply the existence of another?

The prevailing pesticide substitute for organic foods is manure or composted manure. Dangerous pathogens such as E. coli O157 reside in manure. Some guidelines exist for composting manure. Unfortunately, as I learned recently in a presentation by Dr. Francisco Diez-Gonzalez at the University of Minnesota Food Science Department, these guidelines were written a decade ago, before science began to understand the prevalence of E. coli in the environment.

Science now understands that E. coli O157, for example, can persist for years in soil, let alone a more rich environment like manure. In some cases, it may be virtually impossible to rid of an environment of E. coli O157, short of treatment with non-organic substances such as tear gas or asphalt.

Outside of the 2006 spinach outbreak, there have been few food-borne illness outbreaks associated with organic fruits or vegetables. As organic farming continues to grow and detection of food-borne illness increases, the only question is how long it will be until another well-publicized outbreak. When it happens, will consumers continue to believe organic foods are safer? Will the industry be ready with evidence that proves the benefits of organic farming outweigh its risks?

Is It Really A Food-Borne Illness?

At a recent presentation, Dr. Alan Melnick, a public health officer in both Oregon and Washington, provided a useful list of alternative causes of symptoms to consider when someone claims a food-borne illness. Other causes of symptoms that might be confused for food-borne illness include (but may not be limited to):

Another practical piece of advice offered by Dr. Melnick: When assessing a food-borne illness claim, determine whether the incubation period is compatible with the illness. Incubation periods (along with other useful information) were provided by Dr. Melnick (relying upon the CDC) as follows:

Pathogen

Incubation

Symptoms

Duration

Source

Bacillus cereus

1-6 hours (vomiting); 6-24 hours (diarrhea)

Nausea and vomiting or colic and diarrhea 24 hours (short form); 24-48 hours (long form) Soil organism found in raw, dry and processed foods, e.d. rice
Campylobacter 2-10 days; usually 2-5 days Diarrhea, cramps, fever and vomiting; diarrhea may be bloody 2-10 days Raw and undercooked poultry, unpasteurized milk, water
Clostridium botulinum (botulism) 2 hours to 8 days; usually 12-48 hours Vomiting, diarrhea, blurred vision, double vision, difficulty swallowing, descending muscle weakness Variable (days to months) Home-canned food, improperly canned commercial foods
Clostridium perfringens 6-24 hours Cramps, diarrhea 24-48 hours Meats, poultry, gravy; foods kept warm
Enterro-hemorrhagic E. coli, including E. coli O157:H7 and other Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) 1-10 days; usually 3-4 days Diarrhea, frequently bloody; abdominal cramps (often severe); little or no fever; 5-10% develop Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) and average of 7 days after onset, when diarrhea is improving (more common in children, elderly and immune-compromised) 5-10 days Ground beef, unpasteurized milk and juice, raw fruits and vegetables, contaminated water, sprouts, person to person
Listeria 9-48 hours for GI symptoms; 2-6 weeks for invasive disease Fever, muscle aches and nausea or diarrhea; pregnant women may have flu-like illness and stillbirth; elderly, immune-compromised and infants infected from mother can get sepsis and meningitis Variable Fresh soft cheeses, unpasteurized or inadequately pasteurized milk, ready-to eat deli meats and hot dogs
Salmonella 6 hours to 10 days; usually 5-48 hours Nausea, diarrhea, cramps, fever 4-7 days Poultry, eggs, meat, unpasteurized milk or juice, raw fruits and vegetables (e.g., sprouts), person to person
Shigella 12 hours to 6 days; usually 2-4 days Abdominal cramps, fever and diarrhea; stool may contain blood and mucus 4-7 days Contaminated food or water, raw foods touched by food workers, raw vegetables, egg salads, person to person
Staph (toxin) 30 minutes to 8 hours; usually 2-4 hours Nausea, cramps, vomiting, diarrhea  24-48 hours Custards, cream fillings, potato or egg salad, sliced meats
Vibrio cholerae 1-5 days Profuse watery diarrhea and vomiting, severe dehydration 3-7 days Contaminated water and shellfish, street vended food 
Vibrio parahaemolyticus 4-30 hours Watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting  2-5 days Undercooked or raw seafood (fish and shellfish) 
Vibrio vulnificus 1-7 days Vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain; more severe in patients with liver disease or who are immune-compromised; can cause invasive infection (sepsis) 2-8 days Raw seafood, particularly oysters, harvested from warm coastal waters 
Yersinia 1-10 days; usually 4-6 days Appendicitis-like symptoms (diarrhea and vomiting, abdominal pain)  1-3 weeks  Undercooked pork, unpasteurized milk, contaminated water

 

"Organic Pathogens Exclusion"

Insurers are making efforts to exclude food-borne illness claims from coverage under comprehensive general liability (“CGL”) policies. The "Organic Pathogens Exclusion" is a good example.

While a claim for food-borne illness may normally be covered by a CGL policy, if you have an organic pathogens exclusion, your insurer will not provide a defense and will not cover your losses if your business is sued as a result of a food-borne illness.

Organic pathogens exclusions can take multiple forms. Some policies include an endorsement that excludes any “loss” for “any actual, alleged or threatened exposure to, existence of, presence of, ingestion of, inhalation of or contact with any biological agents.” “Biological agents” are usually defined to include things like bacteria, viruses or other pathogens (whether or not a microorganism).

Other policies simply include an endorsement providing that “this policy does not insure any loss, damage, claim, cost, expense, fine, penalty or other sum either directly or indirectly arising out of, relating to or caused by an “organic pathogen.” These policies generally define “organic pathogen” to mean “any organic irritant or contaminant, including but not limited to fungus, bacteria, virus, or other microorganism of any type, including but not limited to their byproducts such as spores or mycotoxin, or any hazardous substance as classified by the EPA.”

Any business involved in food production should take notice. Insurers are actively marketing policies with organic pathogen exclusions to food businesses whose greatest liability exposure may be food-borne illness. Careful and regular review of insurance policies and coverages is essential.