Unfortunately, 2009 does not promise to be any easier than 2008 in protecting your business against food liability claims. Many argue that threats will only increase in the new year. Here are five things you can do to reduce exposure in the coming year:

1. Review Insurance Coverage and Limits Carefully – Both the variety and size of claims are escalating fast. For example, just a couple of years ago consumer claims from non-O157 E. coli, melamine, diacetyl or organic labeling seemed far-fetched, but all are now a grave reality. Federal, state and local governments will continue improving detection techniques since the rash of large, national food-borne illness outbreaks in 2006-08. The Obama administration will likely make increased funding in this area a priority. The odds that your company will be targeted in a nationwide outbreak resulting in claims in the hundreds of millions of dollars are increasing. Because of the exposure, insurance companies now more than ever will be looking for ways to reduce their coverage.

2. Review and Revise Supply Chain Agreements – Aside from insurance, one of the most effective ways to reduce, spread and mitigate risk is to ensure that those in your supply chain provide adequate insurance and indemnity for problems related to their products. But just because your supply agreement happens to mention insurance and indemnity does not necessarily mean those clauses will help when you need them. The only way to ensure that they will be honored and enforced is to ensure that your legal team (experienced in litigating these clauses) drafts these carefully.

3. Reassess Suppliers – Your choice of suppliers may be key to avoiding or reducing risk. Even if you demand sufficient insurance and indemnity from a supplier, a supplier of sufficient size may not be able to access insurance or have assets available to satisfy indemnity obligations. As important as your food safety, HAACP and other programs may be, they are really only as strong as your suppliers’ programs. Careful audit and assessment of your suppliers’ food safety programs is important.

4. Increase Scrutiny Against Fraudulent Imports – Melamine, tainted rice and now “laundered honey” are all good examples of how fraud in the global food chain can dramatically affect unsuspecting U.S. food sellers. [add more advice here?]

5. Review, Update and Rehearse Crisis Management Plans – How your company is prepared to respond to a crisis is a good predictor of how your company will weather the crisis. With the stakes increasing, you need to be prepared to face the worst. Continual review, updating and rehearsal of your crisis management plan is key. Everybody on the crisis management team needs to understand his or her role and be ready for different scenarios.