In a lawsuit filed yesterday, June 12, 2014, in United States District Court for the District of Vermont, four national trade associations representing food producers and manufacturers sued the state of Vermont claiming that the state’s recently passed Act 120, which would require certain food containing ingredients derived from genetically engineered crops to be labeled as such, violates the United States Constitution.

Enacted on May 8, 2014, Act 120 amends Title 9 of the Vermont Statutes to include a new chapter 82A, “Labeling of Food Produced with Genetic Engineering.” The new law requires food that is intended for human consumption and that is offered for sale on or after July 1, 2016 to be labeled as produced from genetic engineering if the food was entirely or partially produced with genetic engineering.

The act also prohibits a manufacturer of a food produced entirely or in part from genetic engineering from labeling the product on the package, in signage, or in advertising as “natural,” “naturally made,” “naturally grown,” “all natural,” or any other similar words. Most importantly, though, unlike other recently passed GMO labeling laws in Connecticut and Maine, Vermont’s law does not require passage of similar laws by other states in order to take effect. It is the first “no-strings-attached” GMO labeling bill to pass in any state.

Act 120 exempts certain foods from the labeling requirements including: food consisting entirely of or derived entirely from an animal that has not itself been produced with genetic engineering; a raw agricultural commodity or processed food that has been grown, raised, or produced without the knowing or intentional use of food or seed produced with genetic engineering, provided that the person responsible for labeling has obtained a sworn statement to that effect; processed food subject to labeling solely because it contains a processing aid or enzyme produced with genetic engineering; alcoholic beverages; processed food with genetically engineered materials that in the aggregate do not account for more than 0.9 percent of the total weight; food certified by an independent organization as not having been knowingly or intentionally produced from or commingled with food or seed produced with genetic engineering; unpackaged processed food intended for immediate human consumption; food served, sold, or otherwise provided in a restaurant or other food establishment; and medical food.

The lawsuit, filed jointly by the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), the Snack Food Association, the International Dairy Foods Association and the National Association of Manufacturers, challenges the constitutionality of Act 120 on the basis that it “fails any standard of First Amendment scrutiny.” Specifically, the associations argue that Vermont does not have a sufficient government interest to compel the labeling of foods produced with genetically engineered ingredients and, therefore, runs afoul of the protections commercial speech is afforded under the First Amendment.

The plaintiffs also challenge Vermont’s law on the grounds that is violates the Fifth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments as well as the Commerce and Supremacy clauses. Moreover, the complaint alleges that Act 120 is preempted by a number of federal laws, including the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act.

As this dispute heads to the court, other states, including Oregon, continue to introduce GMO labeling measures for legislator and voter consideration.