Tag: labeling

A Sticky Situation: Packaging and Placement of Syrup Raises Issues

In a letter to leading supermarket chains, Vermont Representative Peter Welch took issue with the packaging and shelf placement of the “All Natural Syrup” line of table syrup produced by Log Cabin. The primary issues raised in Rep. Welch’s letter related to potential customer confusion due to the similar packaging and frequently close shelf placement … Continue Reading

Prop 65 Targets Cooked Food, Coffee and Vitamin Supplements

This blog entry was originally written by Lee Smith from the California Environmental Law Blog. The Industry Acrylamide Coalition (Coalition) filed suit against the State of California Office of Environmental Health  Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), the agency that manages and revised the Prop 65 list to include 4-metheylimidazole (4-MEI), as a carcinogen.  4-MEI is often found … Continue Reading

Strategies to Defeat Putative Class Claims Challenging Labeling and Marketing of Food Products

April 8, 2011 – Scott Rickman from Del Monte, Lara White from Adams and Reese, and I will be talking at the Defense Research Institute (DRI) food law break-out. This event is held in conjunction with the DRI annual product liability conference in New Orleans. Click here for the complete manuscript that we’ve prepared to … Continue Reading

Front of Package Labeling Claims Survive Motion to Dismiss

A recent decision held that Front of Package (”FOP”) labeling claims may not (yet) be subject to federal preemption. The decision in a putative class action, Chacanaca v. The Quaker Oats Company, involves what has become a common fact pattern: The FDA says an issue is complex and subject to industry guidance and possibly rule-making … Continue Reading

The OchocincO’s Misprint: This Wouldn’t Happen with Flutie Flakes

There is a niche market out there for celebrity-endorsed food products that benefit charities. PLB Sports out of Pittsburgh appears to be a market leader in this niche, labeling products ranging from beef jerky to salsa to mustard with images and slogans relating to both individual sports figures and teams. Probably the most famous of these were … Continue Reading

Denial of Insurance for Consumer Fraud/Lanham Act Claims: Blaming the Product, Not the Advertising?

UPDATE: For those interested in reviewing the Axis policy discussed in the motion, it can be linked here.  I’m often asked in my practice about the availability of insurance coverage for claims by consumers or competitors that products are deceptively labeled, marketed or advertised. Those interested in the topic should follow the litigation between Welch Foods, … Continue Reading

Court Cuts Back Claims In Great Pomegranate Dispute

By Guest Blogger Jay Eckhardt In a dispute over product labeling and marketing, the Coca-Cola Company avoids liability as a result of its careful compliance with FDA rules.  (Also, see Rick’s post from last week, regarding Coca-Cola’s victory in a dispute over its original formula label found on Coke® Classic.)  But pomegranate champion POM Wonderful can still pursue a Lanham Act  deceptive advertising claim against the company. On May 5 the U.S. District … Continue Reading

“Always Coca-Cola”? Who Knows?

On April 27, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois dismissed the case of Kremers v. Coca-Cola Company. The case involved another of these ubiquitous claims where someone is suing saying they were fooled by labeling on a product. Unfortunately, the case was dismissed on grounds that indicate we might never really know the … Continue Reading

Froot Loops Litigation: An Endless Loop for Kellogg’s?

Just over forty years ago, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young came out with their Déja Vu album. Attorneys at Kellogg USA are undoubtedly thinking, “We have all been here before.”  Froot Loops pre-dated Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.  I remember taking the Kellogg’s factory tour in Battle Creek and being handed an individual-sized packet at the end … Continue Reading

FDA Seeks Public Comment Regarding FOP Labeling

This post also appears on the Essential Nutrition Law Blog. In an April 28 release, the Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”) asked for comments and information from the public and other interested parties about front-of-pack (“FOP”) nutrition labeling and shelf tags in retail stores. The FOP is the part of the package label that … Continue Reading

Difficult Week for the Food Industry (Good Week for the Plaintiffs’ Bar): HVP Salmonella and FDA Warning Letters

The week of March 1 saw a double whammy hit food manufacturers. I. Open Letter to Industry on Marketing Claims First, on March 3, FDA sent warning letters to 16 food manufacturers concerning their labeling practices. FDA also issued an Open Letter to Industry warning against certain practices. For example, FDA warned that: o Nutrient content claims … Continue Reading

Consumer Fraud Class Claims Presentation at GMA

In just a couple of weeks (Feb. 23-25), I’ll be in Austin for the GMA Food Claims & Litigation Conference. Let me know if you plan to attend. I’ll be presenting with Scott Rickman from Del Monte Foods on consumer fraud class claims arising from food product labeling and marketing. Anyone in the business of … Continue Reading

Media Headlines and Food Labels Each Might Be Misleading (Film at 11)

A recent headline in the Huffington Post breathlessly importuned:   "Restaurant Food Has Up to 200% More Calories Than Advertised."  If you only read the headline, you might think this was some important information that might change your eating habits.  If you read the article, you would discover a balanced set of conclusions from a fairly limited study. … Continue Reading

Take-Aways from November 17 Webinar: Sustainable Foods Increase Litigation Risks: Developing Strategies to Minimize Exposure

On November 17, we held our final webinar in a three-part series on bringing sustainable food products to market. Take-aways from the third webinar include: • Be aware that "natural" is a hot button when advertising and labeling sustainable food products. • "Sustainable" is not addressed in FTC Green Guides so it is imperative to … Continue Reading

Take-Aways from November 3 Webinar: Making Good Marketing Claims: Product Labeling Pitfalls, Third-Party Certification and “Green Washing”

Tuesday, November 3, we held our second webinar in a three-part series on bringing sustainable food products to market. Thanks again to our presenters and attendees. The recorded webcast was archived and is accessible at this link. Click here to access a PDF copy of the presentation slides. Take-aways from the second webinar include: • … Continue Reading

The Table Is Set For Class Action Litigation Over the Use of Smart Choices Labeling

By Guest Blogger Troy Hutchinson In response to recent consumer complaints and state attorney general investigations that the use of the Smart Choices label is misleading and deceptive, food companies now face the threat of consumer class action litigation under state fraud and deceptive practices statutes. Adding to the uproar, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) … Continue Reading

Snapple Decision – FDA’s Policy Concerning Use of “Natural” Not Entitled to Preemptive Effect

High Fructose Corn Syrup Labeling: Opening the Floodgates For Consumer HFCS Claims? The Third Circuit ruled this week in Holk v. Snapple Beverage Corp., reversing the district court and reinstating the state law putative class claims for consumer fraud and breach of warranty for use of the term “all natural” despite the inclusion of high … Continue Reading

HFCS Labeling Case: Opening The Floodgates For New Consumer Claims?

The Third Circuit may be close to opening the floodgates of claims against food and beverage manufacturers who use high-fructose corn syrup (“HFCS”) in products labeled “all natural.” Shannon Duffy at the Legal Intelligencer reported recently on a “lively hour-long” oral argument in the Third Circuit about reversing a District Court’s dismissal of state consumer claims against … Continue Reading

Avoid Unnecessary Labeling Claims – Ensure That Cooking Instructions Are Adequate

Bill Marler funded independent research at the University of Idaho to study the adequacy of cooking instructions found on the packaging on various retail brands of frozen ground beef patties. The research was published this month in Food Protection Trends. The study found that three of the packages included cooking instructions that “would be inadequate … Continue Reading

FDA Warning to General Mills: Cheerios is a Drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is taking issue with claims that Cheerios cereal can lower cholesterol. In a letter to General Mills, the FDA says that statements made on Cheerios packaging like the claim that the cereal is “clinically proven to help lower cholesterol” make the product a drug under federal law. The agency suggests … Continue Reading
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